Brexit news – Ireland make big admission over EJC’s control over UK after Brexit | UK | News

Leo Varadkar accepted the United Kingdom’s will to leave the European Court of Justice and hinted that he accepted Britain will not longer be under its controls after Brexit. 

Answering questions following his speech at Queen’s University, Belfast, the politician explained how the Brexit process would unfold. 

He said: “I have a straight answer to give you at the moment. What we will do in October is the heads of Government from the 28 member states will sit around the table. 

“Prime Minster May will be asked to leave and then the 27 of us will then lead to what is called Article 50 format and we will decide whether of not sufficient progress has been made. 

“That will depend on what happens over the next few weeks on those three key issues.”

The Irish Prime Minister then claimed that another “mechanism” would have to overlook a future agreement between the European Union and the UK. 

He added: “One of the things that will have to be considered is how will any agreements be upheld and be enforceable. 

“At the moment the mechanism by which most European agreements are upheld just through the European Court of Justice. 

“Which the United Kingdom has indicated it no longer wishes to be part of. So we will need to develop some other mechanism, and I don’t know what that is. 

The EU’s official position is that the Luxembourg-based court would continue having some jurisdiction in Britain after Brexit to guarantee the rights of EU citizens. 

“One of the things that I think will have to form part of the talks.”

During his speech the politician called for the UK to at least consider remaining in the customs union after Brexit. 

Both the Labour Party and Conservative’s have supported leaving both the single market and customs union when cutting ties with Brussels. 

“[Not having a negative impact] means remaining in a customs union, it means having some sort of free trade agreement,” said Mr Varadkar.

“There’s no technological solution, no tolling system, that’s going to tell you what’s in the milk or what standard the burgers are up to – that can only be achieved through common standards.

“Every single aspect of life in Northern Ireland could be affected by the outcome – jobs and the economy, the border, citizens’ rights, cross border workers, travel, trade, agriculture, energy, fisheries, aviation, EU funding, tourism, public services, the list goes on.”

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