Do you know your consumer rights?

SUPPLIED/MBIE

When a business supplies you with a service and there is a problem with the standard of work, you can ask them to fix the problem under the CGA

Have you ever booked a repair only to find out the problem hasn’t gone away?

If a service provider tells you they can do the work you have asked of them and accepts the job, they have an obligation to make sure you get what you’ve asked for.

The Consumer Guarantees Act (CGA) protects us if we have problems with a product or service.

Tim took his car to the mechanic for a repair and was told a new part needed to be ordered to complete the job. Tim explained that he needed his car to drive from Wellington to Auckland in a week’s time for a wedding. The mechanic assured Tim that his car would be fixed in time and he would get to Auckland and back without any problems.

The following week, Tim picked his car up and all appeared to be fine. The road trip North started well – but halfway up the island, the car puttered out. There was no way Tim could get it going.

What would you do in this situation?

When a business supplies you with a service and there is a problem with the standard of work, you can ask them to fix the problem under the CGA. The service is not ‘fit for purpose’.

In this scenario, Tim had explicitly told the mechanic what he needed repaired and had been assured that he would have no issues for his long trip, that the required part would fix the problem. Therefore, Tim could reasonably expect for his mechanic to solve the problem.

In this instance, Tim called his mechanic and asked for help. The mechanic suggested that Tim should hire a car to get to Auckland, and then to fly back home. Then the mechanic arranged for his car to be picked up and delivered to the mechanic in Wellington for further repairs.

Under the CGA, Tim could reasonably expect the mechanic to cover the cost he suffered, as a result of the failure of the service – which is exactly what his mechanic did. What great service!

The CGA in a nutshell

Both buyers and sellers are protected under the CGA.

The CGA gives you rights when you buy both goods and services for personal use.

If you’ve bought something from a New Zealand business, you are protected by law.

Power up on the Consumer Guarantees Act by visiting www.consumerprotection.govt.nz


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